BEST RFP PRACTICES FOR SNOW

//BEST RFP PRACTICES FOR SNOW

BEST RFP PRACTICES FOR SNOW

Purchasing Snow & Ice Management: Quality RFP Creation and Best Practices

Purpose

Best practices for snow and ice management is critical for business continuity and to ensure safety for patrons, tenants and employees. Knowing how to describe your service requirements in a snow and ice management request for proposal (RFP) is difficult, particularly when the nature of the industry and winter weather is so variable.

This document organizes the snow and ice management service procurement process to aid in the creation of RFPs, contracts, and monitoring procedures.

Terminology and Definitions

This document utilizes the Snow & Ice Management Standard Glossary of Terms, published by SIMA at www.sima.org/glossary. We encourage facility management professionals to utilize the Glossary as a complementary tool when using this document to build a complete and realistic RFP.

Table of Contents

Recommended Procurement Timeline………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3

Section 1: Creating a Level of Service (LOS)…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4

Section 2: Scope of Work (SOW)…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

Site Assessment Criteria………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

Building a Scope of Work (SOW)…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

Clarifying Level of Service vs. Scope of Work……………………………………………………………………………………….. 8

Section 3: Terms and Conditions………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9

Documentation and Technology Requirements…………………………………………………………………………………. 9

Fee Structure Selection………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

Accountability and Monitoring…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

Contractual Terms and Conditions…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

Payment and Billing Best Practices……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13

Cessation of Snow Services………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13

Methodology……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14

Snow Management RFP Cheat Sheet…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15

Appendix 1: Scope of Work and Level of Service Criteria…………………………………………………………………………………… 16

Appendix 2: Best Practices Checklist for Snow & Ice Management…………………………………………………………………… 17

Appendix 3: Service Verification Best Practices…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 18

Appendix 4: Best Practices for Snow Industry Risk Management and Shared Accountability…………………………. 19

Appendix 5:  Site Engineering Best Practices Site Map………………………………………………………………………………………. 20

Appendix 6a-c: Detail Procurement Visuals…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21-23

Recognition and References……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 24

Recommended Procurement Timeline

SIMA has created a comprehensive Best Practices Timeline for Snow Procurement. Seek to align your RFP process and subsequent qualifying and hiring of a service provider with the timeline. It will provide more security, better quality, and more time to finalize a contract before winter weather strikes.


Level of Service (LOS):
A description of the expected outcome(s) on a site or set of sites from the completed performance of snow and ice management services. Level of Service typically defines expectations for surface conditions at specific times (completion times) or timeframes, or alternate/additional expectations for events that exceed a defined timeframe and/or a defined amount of accumulation(s). Often referred to as a Service Level Agreement.

For most facilities management (FM) professionals, the RFP would focus on a LOS related to clearing snow from roadway, parking lot and sidewalk surfaces and/or keeping surfaces clear of ice and safe for vehicle and pedestrian traffic. However, each client will have expectations specifically related to the site(s) being serviced that must be clearly communicated in the RFP.

The LOS can be a standalone section of an RFP or the information can be presented throughout sections of an RFP. Minimum expectations to outline in your LOS should include:

  1. Description of Outcomes: Clearly define the end result expected from your snow and ice management service provider. Examples: “Passable walkways to one inch or less of accumulation” or “50% of paved surface visible/regained by 10 a.m. for majority of road lanes,”
  2. Accumulation: Define the trigger forecast that identifies when services should be dispatched or accumulation threshold(s) that define the upper limit of accumulation acceptable on a site. Include any scenarios in which triggers/thresholds may change, taking extended/severe weather events into consideration.
  3. Timeframes: Identify completion time(s) for areas of the site, taking into account key hours in which patrons frequent the site, employee/shift changes, and timing-related variables, including delivery times, major events to consider,
  4. Service priorities: Identify sections or areas of the site that must be cleared first (e.g., sidewalks in front of the store, handicap stalls, delivery ramps clear by 7 a.m., etc.). These descriptions should be communicated clearly with no ambiguity about relative importance related to other areas of the Define priority areas/timing that must serviced regardless of weather conditions.
  5. Post-storm requirements: Identify services that you expect to occur after the event (e.g., ice monitoring related to drifting snow and melt/refreeze; additional clearing; snow stacking or hauling; rooftop snow removal). Consider adding expectations in the event of severe/extended weather
  6. Initiation of additional service: Define clearly who makes the call to initiate any additional services (e.g., additional deicing, etc.) and any associated

Site Assessment Criteria

A quality snow management service will make reasonable efforts to review the size and complexity of the site. However, it is not always feasible for a contractor(s) completing your RFP to physically visit the site and review all variables that could impact service (unless you require them to do so in your RFP).

Basic criteria for site assessment

  • Egress routes/major exits: Are there obstructions or visibility issues (signs, corners, buildings, etc.) that may cause an issue during winter weather? Are there egress routes that should be prioritized?
  • Access: Are there locked gates, security areas, operating hours or other issues that would restrict access to a site?
  • Site map: A quality site map can yield detailed and critical information that is not always available via web-based maps or visual inspections by a contractor, including:
    • Property boundaries included in scope
    • Areas identified for stacking/piling snow and ice
    • High priority areas

Other areas to review

Environment and sustainability issues
  • Proximity to local rivers, streams, lakes, groundwater wells,
  • Local or state environmental regulations related to private and public surface and groundwater
  • Sensitive parks, refuges, or reserves near a site
Architectural and design issues
  • Structures that might create adverse conditions when covered in snow and ice (e.g., overhangs across an entrance, speed blocks, )
  • Parking lot obstructions, slopes or drainage issues
  • Damaged or subpar areas of a structure or site (e.g., drainage spout near sidewalk entrance, damaged concrete, )

Building a Scope of Work (SOW)

Scope of Work (SOW): Defines the service criteria (e.g., snow clearing, ice management, etc.) and specific areas to be serviced on a site or set of sites. The SOW can include any issues that may impact the execution of service (e.g., poor site drainage, slopes/hills, etc.). Synonyms: Statement of Work, Statement of Services. Related term: Level of Service.

Main SOW areas to document

Areas of Service

Map the boundaries of the site(s), or service areas so that it is clear what portions of a site the contractor is responsible for servicing. This is especially important if multiple contractors will be on site.

Acceptable Services

This section should include a list of services that can be used to execute the contract (e.g., snow plowing, snow removal, etc.). These terms are very specific and should be understood before adding to a SOW. Refer to the Glossary of Terms for full definitions:

  • Snow Clearing
  • Snow Relocation
  • Snow Removal
    • Snow hauling
    • Snow storage
  • Snow Melting
  • Snow Stacking
  • Roof Snow Management
  • Deicing
  • Anti-icing
  • Ice Monitoring
Site Inspections and Planning
  • Identify party responsible for creating a site engineering plan that will include priority areas, snow stacking and equipment/salt staging sites,
  • Define criteria to include in site engineering plan
  • Include any areas/priorities/needs identified from site assessment
  • Identify party responsible for preseason and postseason inspections
  • Define if the provider is responsible for installing marking stakes as well as for removal and timing of removal

Define if the provider is responsible for any damage not identified with preseason pictures and/or documented during a preseason walkthrough

  • Schedule postseason site inspections between site management and service provider within 30 days from end of contracted season
  • Document damage and necessary repairs. Define timeframe when repairs are expected to be completed
Material use
  • Identify the associated chemicals/compounds that are accepted in moderate levels on the site, as well as those that are not acceptable due to site-specific structural or environmental sensitivities
  • Determine and outline whether materials can be stored/staged on site
Equipment requirements
  • Identify any specific equipment that you require or specify types of equipment that are NOT acceptable on site if appropriate
  • Outline whether you require dedicated equipment (onsite 24/7) and if it is acceptable to stage equipment on site

There is a great deal of confusion between LOS requirements for a site and the actual SOW. This visual is designed to clearly differentiate between them. Full definitions are in the SIMA Glossary of Terms.

START TIMES

(Triggers/ Thresholds)

EXTREME WEATHER SCENARIO PLANNING

COMPLETION TIMES

 DESCRIPTORS OF SURFACE CONDITIONS

(e.g., surface clear of snow accumulations, etc.)

SITE COMPLEXITY

 SERVICES NEEDED

(snow clearing, sidewalks, hauling, etc.)

Documentation and Technology Requirements

It is essential that any procurement process include a rigorous review and final communication of documentation required for billing and risk management. This includes:

  • General site documentation and recordkeeping, known as a Service At a minimum, the report should include why service was initiated, what services were performed and by what methods, who performed the service and when. Typical reports will include:
    1. Name and location of site
    2. Operator(s)/account manager(s) on site
    3. Equipment on site
    4. Date of service
    5. Time of service (start and end times)
    6. Conditions of physical site upon start of service (snow and ice specific)
    7. Condition of physical site upon completion of service (snow and ice specific)
    8. Weather-related conditions or circumstances
    9. Services rendered
    10. Deicing materials applied (types and amounts)
    11. Notes/special circumstances or conditions
    12. Photos
  • Site or customer-specific documentation requirements, which could include:
  1. Signed sheets from store managers verifying service
  2. GPS or other electronically-created verification of services with a third-party software system
  3. Weather reports from verified weather forecasting service
  • Billing requirements
  1. Level of detail required in invoices for service
  2. Timeframes for invoice submissions, if applicable
  • Technology requirements
  1. If there is specific work order system, invoicing system, documentation portal or other reporting- related technology requirement that all service providers must agree to use

Fee Structure Selection

There are multiple fee structures used in the North American private snow and ice management industry. The selection of a fee structure for a multi-year contract should be undertaken with care and not solely based on one recent season. Some of the main fee structures include:

Per-Event Service: A fee structure where agreed upon fees are assessed for a defined set of services each time an event has occurred. In this case, the parameters of an event are outlined in the contract and are typically restricted by specific timeframes and specific conditions, typically including amount of accumulation (range of inches/centimeters), ice events, and extreme conditions.

Per-Occurrence Service: A fee structure, in which agreed upon fees are assessed each time a salt application, snow clearing or both is completed. This fee structure can result in multiple billable services performed during one Event. Synonyms: Per Push/Per Salt, Per Visit, or Per Application.

Per-Season Service: A fee structure in which agreed upon fees are assessed as a standardized fee (typically monthly) paid over the period of the contract for a defined set of services. Synonyms: Seasonal, Lump Sum, Fixed Fee.

Time & Materials (T&M): A fee structure where agreed upon fees are assessed based on the amount of time (labor and equipment) and materials (deicers, sand, stakes, etc.) used, and any other contractually agreed upon services.

Fee Modifiers

In addition to the fee structures in the marketplace, modifiers can be added to help share financial risk between the client and the contractor, including:

Cap: A fee modifier wherein an upper limit, typically a frequency or measurement (e.g., number of occurrences or number of inches) modifies specific service fees. After the cap has been reached, additional fees or increased costs apply. Typically associated with Per-Season Service. Synonym: Ceiling.

Floor: A fee modifier wherein a discount, credit or fee adjustment is implemented if a lower limit or amount (e.g., number of occurrences, number of inches, etc.) is not reached during a specified duration of service (month, season, etc.). Typically associated with Per-Season Service. Synonym: Minimums.

Inclusion: A fee modifier typically associated with Per-Season Service, in which all materials to conduct the work, including deicers and sand, are included in the overall price of the service, generally with no Caps.

Synonym: All-inclusive.

Accountability and Monitoring

Managing service implementation is the key to success. Identify the core performance measures, methods and metrics that may be used to oversee accountability and control of service, including but not limited to:

  • Feedback from on-site personnel can provide critical insight into service issues or Providing the LOS and SOW to on-site managers/employees is critical, since personal expectations on a site are often higher than contractually agreed upon.
  • Documentation controls: Proactively review invoicing procedures, documentation of service, and communication of challenges or
  • Definitions: Make sure that there is complete clarity in LOS, SOW, and contractual language.
  • Service controls, including:
  • Decision-making: Identifies which parties (and any associated individuals/positions) have control over service levels, in relation to initiation of service, continuing service and new services. Examples: 1. Store manager on duty able to request additional services (e.g., request additional sidewalk deicing) 2. Snow service provider(s) able to provide additional services

without request in order to meet LOS.

  • Communication process: Identify the flow of communication between related parties before, during, or after service, including dealing with the following:
    • Service failure
    • Emergencies or injuries on site
    • Complaints

Contractual Terms and Conditions

  • Decide how preparedness and performing the SOW will be compensated, including scheduled installment payments, per occurrence payments, etc.
  • Service begins/ends date. What is the start and end date of the agreement? What happens if services are required before the start date or after the end date?
  • What federal, state and local laws/regulations must be met for a particular site or portfolio of sites?
Liability
  • Slip and fall liability
  • Property damage: Who is responsible for preseason assessments and postseason repairs?
  • General liability terms: Indemnification, hold harmless clauses,
  • Final review: Are the terms and conditions of liability fair and balanced for all contracted parties?
Non-compliance
  • Define what non-compliance means, including response/ timeliness, quality and invoicing/cost.
  • Define how non-compliance issues are
  • Define repercussions if compliance issues are not remedied, including penalty terms and/or contract termination.

Due to the nature and danger of snow and ice, your RFP and procurement process should align with best practices. It should also be fair and balanced for all parties. Here are the best practice recommendations tied to managing risk effectively and sharing accountability:

Best practices for snow industry risk management and shared accountability
  • Clearly identify communication plan between all contracted parties (including customer, aggregator, service provider, subcontractors).
  • Clearly define who has the authority to make decisions on deicing applications, sidewalks deicing and snow clearing, any additional services, and the ceasing of any services during an
  • Execute in writing any changes, additions, or cessations to contracted services by those identified contractually as having the authority to do Should be executed with liability waivers or associated liability adjustments appropriate to the request.
  • Notify contractor in writing of snow/ice conditions that need addressed or have become
  • Use caution signage in key areas to communicate potentially slippery Clearly identify in agreements which party is responsible for erecting signage.
  • Require damage assessments prior to
  • Immediately notify all parties in the communication chain of any snow/ice-related incident or
  • Require proof of insurance and specifically required policy information such as Snow Riders requirement (CG 2292, etc.), umbrella policies,
  • Contractor should only be liable for negligence by omission or error in service. Requiring the service provider to accept full indemnification creates an imbalance in risk and may be illegal in some

Payment and Billing

Clarity on payment conditions, terms, billing requirements, and timing of payments should be identified upfront, and can be useful in the RFP process, qualification process, and final contracting agreement.

Snow management represents a unique challenge for all parties, since winter weather varies in its severity and timing. Billing and payment methodologies need to reflect the fee structure (Section 5), and not be beholden to the changing weather. However, there are some best practices that should be embedded into the procurement process for snow, as follows:

  • Readiness/Retainer Fees: Readiness fees or down payments on service prior to start of services will help a professional snow service provider gear up for the season, train employees, procure the needed people and materials, and
  • Seasonal contracts: Typically, these payments are broken into equal payments (contract lengths may vary due to geographic location and market drivers), not including any fee modifiers, floors, ceilings,
  • Billing: Clearly communicate requirements for Net Due terms (e.g., 30 days net), along with any necessary parameters on when invoices should be sent and by what method (e.g., e-mail, mail, portal, ).

Cessation of Snow Services

Failure to pay can result in cessation of services on a snow service contract. Third-party management companies are often responsible for coordinating and paying the service providers physically managing snow on a site; any agreements with management companies should consider non-payment issues and planning.

Contractual agreements should reflect a fair and balanced methodology for cessation of service due to lack of payment.

The project started in September 2016 at the SIMA Think Tank event, where facility managers and snow contractors convened and spent several hours discussing in mixed groups and audience-specific groups (e.g., facility managers or snow managers only). Each group generated answers to standardized questions related to Scope of Work, Level of Service, and general procurement issues. Those answers were organized, refined and served as the basis for the creation of the first draft of this guideline and its associated appendixes. From there, SIMA underwent a review process that included recruiting 19 stakeholder reviewers representing snow service providers/contractors (both national and local/regional), facility managers, insurance, and suppliers. Over 100 comments and recommendations from stakeholders were received and individually reviewed by SIMA, and a final draft was delivered to stakeholder reviewers for final comment prior to publishing. Overall, this document has incorporated the insight of 19 facilities/property manager participants and over 50 snow contractors.

SIMA Best Practices Oversight & Methodology

 SIMA’s Best Practices Commitment

Open Access: The guide is available to all industry stakeholders at no cost, regardless of whether they are members of SIMA.

Education: SIMA is spearheading educational partnerships and communication programs to help all parties adopt best practices in snow procurement.

Comprehensive: The guide was reviewed by a large group of stakeholders, including many from the facilities management industry. Other stakeholder groups included snow contractors, grounds management, insurance, and more.

Quality Control & Transparency: The guide is a living document, and suggestions, recommendations, or concerns can be submitted online at www.sima.org/BestPractices. All comments submitted to SIMA will be reviewed and vetted by a group of stakeholders.

Level of Service (SEE PAGE 4)

  • Clearly defined outcomes of end result(s) from snow services
  • Accumulation triggers/thresholds defined
  • Extreme scenarios considered
  • Completion times/time frames outlined
  • Priorities identified and documented on site engineering plans
  • Post-storm requirements or services outlined (hauling, )
  • Decision-making power for additional services defined
  • Use of Best Practices for Level of Service Criteria (Appendix 1)

Scope of Work (SEE PAGE 5)

  • Site engineering plan outlining boundaries, priorities and snow stacking locations
  • Use of SIMA Best Practices for Scope of Work Criteria (Appendix 1) to identify key site variables to inform the bidding process
  • Acceptable services identified
  • Deicing material restrictions identified (if any)
  • Outline permissions related to staging equipment/materials on site
  • Outline whether dedicated equipment is required on site

Terms and Conditions (SEE PAGE 9)

  • Site verification/documentation requirements included (Appendix 3)
  • Technology requirements/items communicated
  • Fee structure(s) clearly identified (per season, per event, )
  • Fee modifiers considered (caps, floors, )
  • Payment/billing procedures consider readiness/preparedness and cessation of services
  • Contract language considers slip and fall liability, property damage, and non-compliance
  • Contract language represents fair/real-world shared risk management between business partners (Appendix 4)

Level of Service Criteria

 

SCOPE OF WORK CRITERIA                                                                                                               Recommended in RFP?
Site engineering plan/map (stacking, plowing routes, stockpile locations, salt bins, priority areas, sloping, etc.) Recommended
City code compliance required best practice Recommended
Deicing restrictions or directions (chemical requirements/prohibitions, etc.) Recommended
Hours of operation, employee hours, staff entrances Recommended
Site square footage Recommended
Subcontracting permissions or prohibitions Recommended
Facility type (commercial, industrial, retail, etc.) Recommended
Preseason damage assessment Recommended
Preseason meeting required Optional
Noise ordinances Optional
Shared walkways and responsibility between tenants Optional
City/public throughway responsibility Optional
% of sidewalk vs. asphalt vs. concrete Optional
Overall volume of patrons (estimated) Optional
Specialty or recommended equipment or restrictions Optional
Deicing product requirements or restrictions Optional
Loading docks identified Optional
Ingresses/egresses identified Optional
Adherence to SIMA Sustainable Salt Use Best Practices (through Operations Level 1) Optional
LEVEL OF SERVICE CRITERIA                                                                                                            Recommended in RFP?
Service verification/documentation requirements Recommended
Priority service areas Recommended
Critical delivery times for goods and services Optional
Non-service areas identified Optional
Refreeze treatment requirements Optional
Off-site snow removal requirements Optional
Pre-treatment (anti-icing) permissions Optional
Hauling requirements Optional
Roof shoveling services Optional
Geographic ranking of priority sites (for RFPs requesting bids on many sites) Optional
Sidewalk triggers vs. parking lot triggers Optional
Planned snow storage location(s) on site Optional

for Snow & Ice Management

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, SAFETY, LIABILITY & RISK MANAGEMENT:

  • Verify proper insurance, and specifically required policy information such as Snow Riders requirement (i.e. CG 2292 ), umbrella policies, etc.
  • Documented site engineering plan to verify areas to properly locate and stack snow to prevent thaw and refreeze areas and line-of-sight issues
  • Documented safety program and policies, including incident reporting process, ongoing education, training and implementation (e.g., tailgate talks, perimeter inspections, safety equipment and PPE)
  • Parking lots and sidewalk clearing process includes ADA compliance guidelines
  • Awareness of deicing/abrasive material impact on freshwater resources related to proper application rates and storage
  • Adheres to SIMA Best Practices in Sustainable Salt Use – Level 1
  • Adheres to SIMA Best Practices in Sustainable Salt Use – Level 2

ESTIMATING, PLANNING & COST EFFECTIVENESS:

  • Documented snow site engineering plan to verify client and site expectations for proper planning of equipment and production capacity (e.g., aerial maps with zone assignments and priority area designations)
  • Utilizes a verifiable estimating system/tool to verify capacity related to size of site (e.g., ft.)
  • Production capacity planning based on system guidelines, cycle times, and resource allocation projections

EXECUTION & RESPONSIVENESS:

  • Documented snow site engineering plan to verify proper production capacity has been dedicated related to level of service and to identify priority service areas
  • Documented snow response planning process for variability of storm scenarios
  • Minimum required deicing materials in inventory at all times necessary for two weeks’ worth of average storm activity (average 2-5 storms dependent on geographic market), including product variety for variable temperatures (NaCL, MgCL2, CaCL2)
  • Planned reserve equipment & labor

QUALITY OF SERVICE:

  • Documented snow site engineering plan to verify priority areas and zones (e.g., handicap zones, fire exits and hydrants, drains, ) and areas for snow to be relocated to ensure proper drainage, line of sight, etc.
  • Utilizes a site inspection process
  • Consistent manager assigned to manage quality expectations

COMMUNICATION, DOCUMENTATION & VERIFICATION:

  • Documented verification process (e.g., site visit/work completion logs)
  • Technology enabled (e.g., electronic reporting systems)
  • Utilizes communication system (e.g., phone tree, electronic notification, centralized call center or contact)
  • Documented organizational communication process flow (e.g., Plan >Do>Verify>Re-Do>Invoice)

CERTIFICATION / STANDARDS & EDUCATION:

  • Certified Snow Professional (CSP™) on staff
  • Advanced Snow Manager (ASM™) on staff
  • Attends continuing education seminars, webinars, trade shows,

EXPERTISE & PROFESSIONALISM:

  • Manager/foreman assigned to manage site(s) has 5 years or more field experience
  • Staff assigned to perform work on the site(s) has 2 years or more field experience
  • Documented organizational and accountability structure for the company and site(s)
  • Company/management is an active member of SIMA
SERVICE VERIFICATION CRITERIA RECOMMENDED BEST PRACTICE?
Before/after service photos Recommended
Third-party weather source (validating snowfall, etc.) Recommended
Service start time Recommended
Service stop time Recommended
Weather/site conditions – start of service Recommended
Weather/site conditions – end of service Recommended
Services performed on site Recommended
Equipment on site Recommended
Preseason/postseason property check for damage Recommended
Deicer application – Product type(s) Recommended
Operator(s) on site Optional
Deicer application – Quantity applied Optional
GPS or electronic timestamp Optional
Pavement surface temperature (on site) – start of service Optional
Pavement surface temperature (on site) – end of service Optional
Video (dash cameras, pre- or post-service video, etc.) Optional
Video security cameras (managed/owned on site by property owner) Optional
GPS geofencing Optional
Management verification (signoff by customer) Optional
Call/text service (IVR) Optional
FM daily inspection Optional
Third-party app or software entry (required of the service provider) Optional

Risk Management and Shared Accountability

 

 

•                                  Clearly identified communication plan between all contracted parties (including customer, aggregator, service provider, subcontractors).
•                 Clearly defined who has the authority to make decisions on deicing applications, sidewalks deicing and snow clearing, any additional services, and the ceasing of any services during an event.
•                 Any changes, additions, or cessations to contracted services must be executed in writing by those identified contractually as having the authority to do so, and should be executed with liability waivers or associated liability adjustments appropriate to the request.
•                 Written notifications from facility to contractor related to snow or ice conditions on a site that need to be addressed or have become hazardous.
•                 Use of caution signage in key areas, communicating potentially slippery conditions. Identify clearly in agreements which party is responsible for putting signage out during slippery conditions
 

•                 Damage assessment required prior to season.

 

•                 Immediate notification to all parties in the communication chain of snow or ice related incident or accident.

•                 Proof of insurance, and specifically required policy information such as Snow Riders requirement (CG 2292, etc.), umbrella policies, etc.
•                 Contractor should only be liable for negligence by omission or error in service. Requiring the service provider to accept full indemnification creates an imbalance in risk and may be illegal in some states.

This guide would not be possible without the input and participation of many people, including all attendees of the 2016 SIMA/PRSM Think Tank. Those individuals created a strong base for our stakeholder review process to ensure that the guide and its associated best practice recommendations consider the challenges and needs of all parties engaged in procurement of professional snow and ice management services.

By |2018-03-24T17:04:49+00:00March 25th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

About the Author:

Leave A Comment